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View Full Version : spoke to vet about oscar's aggression



Kerie
02-03-2006, 04:35 PM
she thinks we need some training but that it's just something we have to nip in the bud and it won't be an ongoing problem. she seems to have a good understanding of oscar because he has been in her office overnight and for some long visits (when his tummy was bad). there are many dog behaviorists in our area and if anyone wants to tell us how to pick one, please do. She finally convinced my husband that playing tug of war can be harmful!!!!!! I'd been trying!!

Our vet has some recommendations, we have a friend who had a great trainer for their rhodesian ridgeback (beautiful big dog, by the way, and Oscar loves her), and there is an obedience school in the area that is well known and not usually expensive. price will be a factor.

Jen
02-03-2006, 05:16 PM
:appl: :appl: Sounds like you've received good advice and have some really good options for training and behaviorists. Let us know what you decide to do!

Lisa
02-03-2006, 05:39 PM
:cheer2: :cheer2: Wonderful. I am very happy your talked to your vet.

K2
02-03-2006, 05:42 PM
Good advice. Finding a trainer can be a huge effort, but it's worth it!!

Anatresia
02-03-2006, 05:45 PM
I'm in the same boat as you- Rigby starts on Monday for the same reasons. She's just going to Petsmart at first, because they're cheap and easy to get to. Hopefully, it will work with her. I think she just needs socialization- she's a spaz.

Good luck with Oscar- I hope he responds well to the behavior management right away!

Kerie
02-03-2006, 05:54 PM
I'm in the same boat as you- Rigby starts on Monday for the same reasons. She's just going to Petsmart at first, because they're cheap and easy to get to. Hopefully, it will work with her. I think she just needs socialization- she's a spaz.

Good luck with Oscar- I hope he responds well to the behavior management right away!

I think we are still going to repeat his basic obedience class and can add some training that is specific to his problem. Can we do this without breaking the bank?

He was kept in the kitchen overnight and now I think he is going to be even more resistant about going in there when I leave to go out tonight.

Also, I had been taking him on long walks. He enjoys it and comes out tired and he just sleeps. But now he is so evil on days that I do not take him!!!

Nancy
02-03-2006, 06:49 PM
i'm sure oscar will do great once he starts his training! keep us posted!

JanUet
02-03-2006, 06:53 PM
Training helped my wittle Sophie. She was very aggressive to Doug and Brett.
They can now love on her and she doesn't growl or show her pearly yellows at them.
We took her to Puppy training classes.

Good Luck to you!

Kerie
02-03-2006, 06:54 PM
As an aside, why is it that I can get my vet on the phone more easily than my own doctor? I had major surgery 2 years ago and I wish I had used this vet instead of the doctor that I used. I think I'm joking but I'm not even sure!!!!

Patt
02-03-2006, 08:56 PM
Thank you for checking with your vet. Between her recommendations and those of your friend’s trainer, hopefully a solution which meets Oscar’s needs can be identified. Because Tug-of-war games encourage dominant agression, I prefer taking walks. A program of regular long walks would be perfect for Oscar and would help clear his mind, making him more willing to listen and respond to you. Walking also provides dogs with a sense of direction and accomplishment. So if you really want to both bond with and establish your authority over him, take Oscar for some long walks daily.

Here is a site which describes the difference between trainers and behaviorists. We have used both, and found the behaviorist provided the best answer for us.

http://petcaretips.net/dog-training-school-behaviorist.html



p.s. I always ask my vet for Human medical advice. :)

Jacqueline
02-03-2006, 11:56 PM
She finally convinced my husband that playing tug of war can be harmful!!!!!! I'd been trying!!

Okay, stupid question. Playing tug of war can be dangerous in dogs that are aggressive, or in all dogs? When I play with Taffy and her toys, we play tug and growl, until she lets go and I throw it, she runs and gets it, and we start over again. But when she has a bone, I can put my face right next to hers and ask for a bite and she just lets me clown around with her. I can take her bones away with nary a growl or snap. She and my hubby don't do the growling thing when they play, and she looks at him like "daddy, you just don't get it."

Am I doing something I shouldn't be? She is not aggressive toward any puppers she meets when we are out shopping, or with the kids or people that want to pet her.

Kerie
02-04-2006, 02:12 AM
Okay, stupid question. Playing tug of war can be dangerous in dogs that are aggressive, or in all dogs? When I play with Taffy and her toys, we play tug and growl, until she lets go and I throw it, she runs and gets it, and we start over again. But when she has a bone, I can put my face right next to hers and ask for a bite and she just lets me clown around with her. I can take her bones away with nary a growl or snap. She and my hubby don't do the growling thing when they play, and she looks at him like "daddy, you just don't get it."

Am I doing something I shouldn't be? She is not aggressive toward any puppers she meets when we are out shopping, or with the kids or people that want to pet her.

Well, be careful. I have had Oscar almost a year and he was always fiesty but his aggression is relatively new. I read a lot of books and the 2 dachshund websites. From what I have read, some trainers and vets believe that tug of war is never good, some say it is okay if done right and that it is a way to bond with your dog. What I find interesting is the idea that it teaches your dog to use his or her strength against you. Today my vet said that her opinion is that if you hold the object and let the dog pull it, that is fine, but you should not pull back against your dog. Oscar is one of those dogs that can play fetch all day long and when he brings back the toy, he wants to play some tug of war with it.

Oh--another very interesting tidbit: Oscar often tries to wake up my husband to play, or to play when my husband does not want to. He pushes toys against my husband and keeps nudging with his nose. Today when we told the vet how Oscar has been acting with his Kong, she asked, even before we told her, if Oscar ever seems to be DEMANDING TO PLAY with us. Apparently that is another sign of aggression, even though people find it cute. I do find it cute but my husband is tired of it.

alfina
02-04-2006, 02:38 AM
Kerie,

it is not a sign of agression. Demanding to play is a sign of him trying to be dominant. Again you and your husband need to establish yourseves as leaders of the pack. And the leaders only play when THEY feel like it.

Kerie
02-04-2006, 05:43 AM
Kerie,

it is not a sign of agression. Demanding to play is a sign of him trying to be dominant. Again you and your husband need to establish yourseves as leaders of the pack. And the leaders only play when THEY feel like it.

I think that what my vet was trying to point out was that his guarding of his food and his demands to play stem from the same place. I certainly know that we need to establish leadership, yet I think that some people here may think that I don't realize that. I've already read all I can find about this. I found a list of behaviors that are considered dominant and a list of "opposite" behaviors that are considered non-dominant. Oscar has many of the non-dominant behaviors also, yet I still understand what you are saying about him. He may only be trying to assert authority in 1-2 ways. The demands to play are difficult because most people who meet Oscar find it super cute and not many people would see it as part of a problem. When he meets other dogs, he challenges them for about 5 minutes, then often becomes submissive!

alfina
02-04-2006, 08:02 AM
Sorry Kerie, didn't mean to lecture you.

Also could be that he is bored? I remember Sabrina used to pester us to play with her all the time when she was the only doxie. When we got Seb, she stopped. She had a playmate. But she does position herself above all my other dogs. She is definitely alpha-wanna-be. I have to remnd her from time to time. Usually a couple of nights in the laundry room fixes it and then she is ok again for a while.

With Oscar, I'd start " you have to work for everything" program. I made Sabrina sit before I'd put her food down. Made sure I was going through any doors first, etc. I am sure you know it all already. It is hard to do when they look at you with their big eyes and you want to snuggle them instead. But it does help them at the end.

Obediene does help. So, if you can find a class, I'd definitely go for it. You could be amazed.

Kerie
02-04-2006, 04:16 PM
Personally, yes, I believe he could be bored!!! It's quiet around here in the winter months. And we'd all love another dachsie. I posted about it recently. I'm not up to it right now but boy do we all want one!!



Sorry Kerie, didn't mean to lecture you.

Also could be that he is bored? I remember Sabrina used to pester us to play with her all the time when she was the only doxie. When we got Seb, she stopped. She had a playmate. But she does position herself above all my other dogs. She is definitely alpha-wanna-be. I have to remnd her from time to time. Usually a couple of nights in the laundry room fixes it and then she is ok again for a while.

With Oscar, I'd start " you have to work for everything" program. I made Sabrina sit before I'd put her food down. Made sure I was going through any doors first, etc. I am sure you know it all already. It is hard to do when they look at you with their big eyes and you want to snuggle them instead. But it does help them at the end.

Obediene does help. So, if you can find a class, I'd definitely go for it. You could be amazed.

lotsadox
02-04-2006, 06:22 PM
I'm glad you're taking Oscar to obedience school. I'm sure it will help. My advice is to get to class early the first time and talk to the instructor. Explain his specific problems and ask for help. As the class progresses don't be afraid to ask for help. The OS that I took Cash and Miller to was excellent and the instructors were very willing to help with specific problems. It was a little more expensive than PetsMart, but worth it for the extra attention and advice that I got.

Kerie
02-04-2006, 10:06 PM
Sorry people. I was getting frustrated because I've been talking about this with too many people. You can't believe the advise I am getting.

Here is some hope--I read that if the dog is only misbehaving in some situations, then he will learn more easily. This means that he knows how to take cues about when and where he will be able to be aggressive or dominant and it means that he knows how to control himself when he wants to. I would have thought that Oscar is a more complicated case, but maybe he is just really smart!!!

Fluffy
02-05-2006, 11:08 AM
Kerie, I dont have much insight or advice to give you on the aggression, however I wanted to wish you the best of luck!! My two have never really been aggressive, but I can see where it would be very frustrating. Cara's Buddy can be aggressive at times, and after a day of dealing with that, I'm usually about at my wit's end!! Keep us posted on his progress!!
On a side note, I am SO GLAD you guys mentioned tug-of-war!! I do NOT play that with Buddy because I don't like the way he growls. My sister and a few friends will get him going and play with him like that and when I ask them to please stop, that he's growling, they just say "Its a play growl, you can tell the difference." It scares me when he does that because you never know when they could "snap" and start being aggressive. I'm going to make sure I tell them that it really IS bad!!! Thanks for the info!!!

oceangirls
02-05-2006, 02:26 PM
The demands to play are difficult because most people who meet Oscar find it super cute and not many people would see it as part of a problem.

You are so right!! All kinds of training things I would like to implement, then my in-laws look at me like I'm crazy.

Not at all expert in training or behavioral issues - will just send you best wishes and rayz :rayz: :rayz: :rayz: , it seems like you are on the right track.